Publications

  • Featured
    Date: 6/1/2014

    Confronting Impunity and Engendering Transitional Justice Processes in Uganda

    This briefing paper summarizes the findings of consultations undertaken by ICTJ with women’s groups in Gulu, Lira, and Soroti on confronting impunity and engendering transitional justice processes in northern Uganda. Its purpose is to help incorporate women’s needs and justice demands into the drafting and implementation of the Ugandan government’s forthcoming transitional justice policy. The paper’s many detailed recommendations provide guidance on how transitional justice measures, such as material and symbolic reparations, can recognize and redress the specific harms suffered by women as a result of the LRA conflict.

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  • Featured
    Date: 12/20/2012

    Unredressed Legacy: Possible Policy Options and Approaches to Fulfilling Reparations in Uganda

    Author: Graham Carrington and Elena Naughton

    There is now an opportunity to design and implement a reparations program for victims of human rights and humanitarian law violations in Uganda. As with other countries emerging from conflict, the contours of a Ugandan reparations policy have been the subject of extended debate and generated high expectations. While the government has embarked on several reconstruction, recovery, humanitarian, and development programs for the north and other conflict-affected parts of the country, these programs were explicitly motivated by stabilization, development, and poverty-reduction objectives, rather than justice and reparations goals. This report examines approaches for identifying and categorizing victims, defining benefits and beneficiaries, and sequencing the delivery of reparations, offering guidance in assessing how the needs of the most vulnerable victims can be met and what long-term capacities must be put in place to implement a comprehensive reparations program.

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  • Date: 9/26/2012

    Confronting the Past: Truth Telling and Reconciliation in Uganda

    Author: ICTJ Uganda

    National healing and reconciliation in Uganda requires a multilayered truth-telling process comprised of community and national processes that are mutually reinforcing and should not be mutually exclusive, as proposed by the JLOS report. A national truth-telling body should address issues of state responsibility. Importantly a national truth-telling process would be in a strong position to solicit and consider submissions for institutional reforms and reparations proposed by community-based processes throughout Uganda. Additionally it could recommend the necessary measures to redress the suffering of victims and prevent the reoccurrence of conflict and abuse.

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  • Date: 9/24/2012

    Reparations for Northern Uganda: Addressing the Needs of Victims and Affected Communities

    Author: ICTJ Uganda

    Since independence Ugandans have endured episodes of violence and human rights abuses across successive political regimes and transitions with devastating consequences. During two decades of conflict in the northern Uganda involving the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and the government forces, human rights abuses were perpetrated against individuals, families, and communities. With the return to peace, the government, victims’ groups, and civil society are now considering how to move forward with a national policy on transitional justice that includes reparations for victims in the north given the magnitude of serious violations that were committed.

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  • Date: 3/4/2011

    We Can’t Be Sure Who Killed Us: Memory and Memorialization in Post-conflict Northern Uganda

    Author: ICTJ; Julian Hopwood

    This reports examine the role of memorials in transitional justice processes, based on research conducted in the Acholi and Lango subregions of northern Uganda. It offers recommendations to those planning memorial activities on how to achieve the highest impact.

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  • Date: 5/1/2010

    Uganda: Impact of the Rome Statute and the International Criminal Court

    Author: ICTJ; Michael Otim, Marieke Wierda

    The situation in Uganda presented a challenging first case for the International Criminal Court (ICC). The origins of the conflict between the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and the government are complex, and many people in the north resent the government for failing to protect them from the LRA.

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  • Date: 1/1/2009

    Conflict and Transitional Justice in Africa

    Author: ICTJ

    Since the early 1990s, several dozen Sub-Saharan African countries have attempted to address past human rights abuses by relying on a varied mix of transitional justice mechanisms, such as prosecutions, truth-seeking and reconciliation efforts, reparations, or reform of their justice and security systems.

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  • Date: 1/1/2009

    Conflict and Transitional Justice in Africa (Dari)

    Author: ICTJ

    Background on the challenges in addressing legacies of past violence in sub-Saharan African countries such as Uganda, Ethiopia and Eritrea. The fact sheet gives an overview of the situation in the region and ICTJ's approaches in promoting transitional justice in individual countries.

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  • Date: 1/1/2008

    Northern Uganda: Research Note on Attitudes About Peace and Justice in Northern Uganda

    Author: ICTJ; HRC; Payson Center

    This research note presents preliminary population-based data on attitudes about peace and justice in northern Uganda. The survey data presented in this report were collected from April to June 2007 in eight districts of northern Uganda.

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  • Date: 12/1/2007

    When the War Ends: Peace, Justice, and Social Reconstruction in Northern Uganda

    Author: ICTJ, Human Rights Center, Payson Center for International Development

    This report compares findings from two population-based surveys (in 2005 and 2007) in districts of northern Uganda most affected by 21 years of conflict, including the Acholi districts. The studies capture attitudes about peace, justice, and social reconstruction. Developing a deeper understanding of the needs and desires of affected populations is crucial for long-term conflict resolution.

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